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1/2012

 

Bruno, the Child Who Learned to Fly - presentation and exhibition in Rome

Written by Nadia Terranova, Orecchio Acerbo Editore, Rome 2012

Bruno is a story about Bruno Schulz, the Polish Jewish writer and artist. Illustrating this book was a very special and strong experience to work on.
The story describes Bruno Schulz as a child who grew up in the shade of his mentally unstable father. The father, trapped in various visions and metamorphoses, has been an inspiration to Bruno the child and designed his world perception and his unique observation on life, as he grew up and became a great author. The sensitive, “different” child, unlike the others’ dullness and rejection towards the father, was observing and listening to his father’s wild hallucinations, his murmurs and his ecstatic speeches. He was observing and listening. Because that is the nature of children like him – they are always observing and listening. When I read Schulz’s work, I felt as if the whole world is winding, going through mutations and forming into ever changing life forms, containing some kind of parallel lives, that can be seen only by those treasured ones like Schulz, like a mad genius’s hallucination. But Bruno, unlike his father, knew how to separate art from reality, and became a great author.

Schulz was also a painter and even taught painting in the local school in his hometown. In some pages in the book I combined his drawings into the illustrations.

When I met Nadia in Rome for the exhibition of my original artwork in Tricromia Gallery and for the book presentation, I brought the Hebrew copy of Schulz's Cinnamon Shops with me. We realized that we both highlighted exactly the same paragraph, one of many in which he describes his father: 

It is worth noting how, in contact with that unusual man, all thing retreated, as it were, to the root of their being, rebuilt their phenomenon down to its metaphysical core – they returned to their primordial idea, only to betray it at that point and lurch into those dubious, daring and equivocal regions that I shall here succinctly call the Regions of the Great Heresy.

{Translated by John Curran Davis}
Opening at Tricromia Gallery, Rome

Opening at Tricromia Gallery, Rome

Signing books at the opening

Signing books at the opening

Opening at Tricromia Gallery, Rome

Opening at Tricromia Gallery, Rome

Author Nadia Terranova

Author Nadia Terranova

Opening at Tricromia Gallery, Rome

Opening at Tricromia Gallery, Rome

Discussion panel at Libreria Europea, Rome

Discussion panel at Libreria Europea, Rome